Carmen Kynard

Carmen Kynard

Carmen Kynard
Associate Professor
Phone number: 
212.621.4179
Website URL: 
Room number: 
7.65.27NB

Education

PhD  English Education, New York University
BA  Feminist Studies and Afro-American Studies, Stanford University

Bio

My name is Carmen Kynard and I am an associate professor of English and Gender Studies at John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the City University of New York (CUNY) and associate professor of English, Urban Education, and Critical Psychology at the CUNY Graduate Center. I interrogate race, Black Feminisms, AfroDigital/African American cultures and languages, and the politics of schooling with an emphasis on composition and literacies studies. I am a former high school teacher with the New York City public schools/Coalition of Essential Schools and have led numerous projects focused on language, literacy, and learning with agencies like the Community Learning Centers Grant Project in Harlem, African Diaspora Institute/Caribbean Cultural Center of New York, Center for Black Literature at Medgar Evers College, and the New York City Writing Project.  I have published in Harvard Educational Review, Changing English, College Composition and Communication, College English, Computers and Composition, Reading Research Quarterly, and more. My first book, Vernacular Insurrections: Race, Black Protest, and the New Century in Composition-Literacy Studies (SUNY Press, 2013) won the 2015 James Britton Award and makes Black Freedom a 21st century literacy movement.  My most current projects focus on young Black women in college, Black Feminist/Afrofuturist digital vernaculars, and AfroDigital Humanities learning.  Today I trace my research and teaching at my website: “Education, Liberation, and Black Radical Traditions” (http://carmenkynard.org). 

Research interest

For almost twenty-five years now, I have worked in and with culturally and linguistically pluralistic, urban settings, in and out of schools, from K-16. As an interdisciplinary researcher and scholar, I am especially interested in the ways that race, gender, sexuality, African Diaspora cultures, Black feminisms, and the politics of schooling collide. I work at the intersection of a few, interrelated disciplines and fields: composition-rhetoric studies, literacies research, feminist/gender studies, and critically raced theories (for more on the focus of my research and scholarship, click here).  Today, the content and political-methodologies of my manuscripts, journal articles, keynote addresses, conference presentations, grants, workshops, and community work involve a close following of four, overlapping cyclical themes (click on the links below for access to my publications):